Posts Tagged ‘Charity’


Why kids in SE Asia need your support

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

Why we are supporting Child’s Dream…

We both care about children – Chris works with vulnerable young people and children in crisis, Liz volunteered for a charity called Home Start which supports families with children under 5.  So we are both passionate about supporting children and their families, to give them the confidence, knowledge and belief that they can improve their situation or make changes in their lives.

Sustainability

We both want to work with a charity whose projects are sustainable… ‘give a man a fish and he can feed his family for a day, teach a man to fish and he can feed his family for a lifetime’. Child’s Dream goes one step further than that and works with the communities to find out what they need…is fishing the best option? Do you even want to fish? The projects provide infrastructure, community development and resources, building both sustainable school structures and lasting relationships with the villagers. The communities are actively involved and ultimately have ownership of the projects, with a vested interest in their survival.

Risks to children in Southeast Asia

In the UK we are very aware of the suffering of children in Africa and it’s easy to forget that there are other children in the world who live in equal poverty. South East Asia is one of the poorest places for a child to grow up. The risks children face include child trafficking, being force into the sex industry, forced resettlement or displacement, as well as a lack of basic healthcare and clean water, often living in families surviving on just a few dollars a day.

Despite the vast array of 24hr news channels and newspapers online, there is very limited coverage or reportage about this region and the lives of the people who live here. No one hears much about the lives of children living in Thailand, Loas, Cambodia, Burma or Vietnam. No one tells their stories.

Globalisation – cheap goods and cheap labour

Here in the UK we enjoy buying cheap products from linen shirts to DVD players that cost just £30, we expect to eat a wide variety of food all year round from king prawns to mangos.  What we forget or don’t know is that many of the foods and products that we want, come from South East Asia and the people who grow, produce and manufacture these things for the west, live in poverty. There is a human cost, if not a retail cost!

Whilst globalisation has benefited some, it has also led to a change in the way of life for many. With increased urbanisation and industrial development, people are under pressure to go to the cities to earn more money, moving away from their families and working and living under harsh conditions. As few are very well educated, the only option open to them is factory work, manufacturing items or processing food mostly for export. Even the governments in this region focus on the development of natural resources for export, not on the development of communities.

Surely we can’t just keep taking? Surely it’s time to give something back?

Education and a future

Education is key to the children in this region. Whilst some may consider the idea of Europeans arriving in countries and prescribing education as the answer, as arrogant or may argue that it undermines their way of life – subsistence farming and agriculture – we don’t believe this to be true or fair. Their way of life has already been undermined and changed forever by the impact of globalisation and urbanisation, by our demand for cheap goods and cheap labour, and their governments’ policies on trade and export. If farming is no longer a long term option, then education will give children a chance to learn skills and equip them with knowledge to understand the world they are growing up in. Education gives people choices, the children may have little in terms money, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t have aspirations to grow up and do something interesting with their lives, or at the very least earn enough money to be able to support their families.

Education and a school environment also provides stability, where perhaps there is little elsewhere in their lives. It gives children self-esteem and self-belief, empowering them to learn and grow with confidence. School isn’t just about learning, it is a place to find  out who you are and what you can do, you may be musical or artistic, or good at sport, good with other children; a place where people listen to you and share with you.  Why should we deny any child access to education, everyone deserves the choice and the chance to become who they really are.

Child’s Dream are giving children and their families that choice.

To make a donation please visit:  http://childsdream.org/donate/ and let us know too so we can add you to our grand total.  We really value your support, thanks!

Why we are supporting Child’s Dream…

We both care about children – Chris works with vulnerable young people and children in crisis, Liz volunteers for a charity called Home Start which supports families with children under 5. So we are both passionate about supporting children and their families, to give them the confidence, knowledge and belief that they can improve their situation or make changes in their lives.

Sustainability

We both want to work with a charity whose projects are sustainable… ‘give a man a fish and he can feed his family for a day, teach a man to fish and he can feed his family for a lifetime’. Child’s Dream goes one step further than that and works with the communities to find out what they need…is fishing the best option? Do you even want to fish? The projects provide infrastructure, community development and resources, building both sustainable school structures and lasting relationships with the villagers. The communities are actively involved and ultimately have ownership of the projects, with a vested interest in their survival.

Risks to children in Southeast Asia

In the UK we are very aware of the suffering of children in Africa and it’s easy to forget that there are other children in the world who live in equal poverty. South East Asia is one of the poorest places for a child to grow up. The risks children face include child trafficking, being force into the sex industry, forced resettlement or displacement, as well as a lack of basic healthcare and clean water, often living in families surviving on just a few dollars a day.

Despite the vast array of 24hr news channels and newspapers online, there is very limited coverage or reportage about this region and the lives of the people who live here. No one hears much about the lives of children living in Thailand, Loas, Cambodia, Burma or Vietnam. No one tells their stories.

Globalisation – cheap goods and cheap labour

Here in the UK we enjoy buying cheap products from linen shirts to DVD players that cost just £30, we expect to eat a wide variety of food all year round from king prawns to mangos.  What we forget or don’t know is that many of the foods and products that we want, come from South East Asia and the people who grow, produce and manufacture these things for the west, live in poverty. There is a human cost, if not a retail cost!

Whilst globalisation has benefited some, it has also led to a change in the way of life for many. With increased urbanisation and industrial development, people are under pressure to go to the cities to earn more money, moving away from their families and working and living under harsh conditions. As few are very well educated, the only option open to them is factory work, manufacturing items or processing food mostly for export. Even the governments in this region focus on the development of natural resources for export, not on the development of communities.

Surely we can’t just keep taking? Surely it’s time to give something back?

Education and a future

Education is key to the children in this region. Whilst some may consider the idea of Europeans arriving in countries and prescribing education as the answer, as arrogant or may argue that it undermines their way of life – subsistence farming and agriculture – we don’t believe this to be true or fair. Their way of life has already been undermined and changed forever by the impact of globalisation and urbanisation, by our demand for cheap goods and cheap labour, and their governments’ policies on trade and export. If farming is no longer a long term option, then education will give children a chance to learn skills and equip them with knowledge to understand the world they are growing up in. Education gives people choices, the children may have little in terms money, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t have aspirations to grow up and do something interesting with their lives, or at the very least earn enough money to be able to support their families.

Education and a school environment also provides stability, where perhaps there is little elsewhere in their lives. It gives children self-esteem and self-belief, empowering them to learn and grow with confidence. School isn’t just about learning, it is a place to find  out who you are and what you can do, you may be musical or artistic, or good at sport, good with other children; a place where people listen to you and share with you.  Why should we deny any child access to education, everyone deserves the choice and the chance to become who they really are.

Child’s Dream are giving children and their families that choice.

Related Blog Entries

 Subscribe in a reader or enter your email address and get the next post via email

Delivered by FeedBurner

Connecting Children: Brightening Futures

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Take a look at this fantastic opportunity to be part of a global project that aims to engage students, help them learn about other countries and cultures, make their learning real and allow them to make a difference to other people’s lives.


Heard about the Ugandan Global Project?  If not, take a look now.
Inspired?
Want to do something similar?
Read on to find out more.

If you are interested in taking part in this global charity/educational project or would just like to know a bit more, leave a comment expressing your interest and teacher Sarah Leakey or Bikeabout will get back to you shortly.
At present, the proposed time for the project would be May to July 2011.
Sarah will have a Year 2 (Grade 1) class however we hope that won’t put teachers with older classes off and home schoolers.  We already have 6 groups involved.  It would be great to get both a range of ages and a mix of similar ages to broaden the experience for all involved.

See the edublog to find out what has happened already http://connectingchildren.edublogs.org/

Aims:

To broaden our own children’s horizons by letting them experience other countries and cultures from all walks of life.

To empower our children to make a difference and show them that you’re never too small to make a change.

Provide them with a real context for a whole host of valuable learning opportunities.

Have a huge amount of fun!

Help Child’s Dream and Bikeabout build a school for underprivileged children in the Mekong Sub-Region

childsdreamlogosm Supporting The Charity: Child’s Dream

Child’s dream was established in 2003 by Marc Jenni and Daniel Siegfried as a charity organisation dedicated to unconditional help for underprivileged children in the ‘Mekong Sub-Region’ which includes Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos and Cambodia.  This region is at the core of many humanitarian crises and children are suffering the most. To find out more about Child’s Dream and their projects, visit: www.childsdream.org

bikeaboutlogo The Adventure: Bikeabout

Liz Wilton and Chris Leakey are a British cycle touring couple (Chris and Sarah are brother and sister) who have undertaken the rather adventurous task of cycling from New Zealand back to England.  As part of this, they have chosen to support Child’s Dream and aim to raise £20,000 (approximately Oz: $31,800 / USA: $31,500 / NZ: $41,200).  This would be enough money to build a whole school!
Find out more about Bikeabout here: www.bikeabout.co.uk and why they chose to support this charity here: http://www.bikeabout.co.uk/charity/whychildsdream.shtml

The teacher: Sarah Leakey

Sarah is a primary teacher who was trained and worked in the UK but is currently working in New Zealand. She has a wealth of teaching knowledge and a real passion for education and inspiring children to learn. She is an expert at working with challenging and unmotivated children and currently working on her MA in Education with a focus on formative assessment.  Amongst all this she still manages to find time update her professional blogs and then go skydiving or climbing on the weekend.

Class Blog: http://leakeysblog.edublogs.org
Professional Learning Blog: http://leakeysbubble.edublogs.org
Diigo Educational Links: http://www.diigo.com/user/sarah_leakey


About the project
It is not our aim here to set out how the project will run, that will be determined by the people who choose to be involved and the children we work with.
It might be helpful to know that:

Chris and Liz (Bikeabout) will be able to:

Give skype sessions (depending on location and access to fast enough internet)

Provide tailored resources, video, photos anything you can think of for classes related to your curriculum.

Correspond via email to any question the class, pupil or teacher have.

Child’s Dream have been most helpful in the past providing photos, responding to children’s emails etc. and have just set up their own youtube site with videos that give a better insight to their work, this is limited to one video in English (Laos Field 2) at the moment but I am told more are on the way.  The others (in other languages) still provide useful images and talking points but are better played with the sound off.

Due to the nature of Bikeabout being a cycling project, Sarah was thinking that she might link it with work on cycle safety or encouraging cycling to school for example (although this is up to each individual person).

In terms of the actual event to raise money, we think this would be best left up to the children, they usually come up with the most creative ideas.

To get a bit of an insight into the Bikeabout adventure, read the blog or have a look around the rest of the website.

Join in now – http://connectingchildren.edublogs.org/

Share this with other teachers or educators that might be interested by clicking on the share buttons below.

Comment and show your interest or email and show your interest.

Thanks, we look forward to hearing from you.

Chris, Liz and Sarah

Related Blog Entries

 Subscribe in a reader or enter your email address and get the next post via email

Delivered by FeedBurner

7000km & two donations in 24 hours!

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

We’ve cycled 7000kms and we’ve just recieved £150 in donations for Child’s Dream! Huge thanks to Sarah and Jon for sponsoring us. Thanks also to Jorrit and Nicky for their donation and a fantastic blog post about our trip!

Made In Thailand

Related Blog Entries

 Subscribe in a reader or enter your email address and get the next post via email

Delivered by FeedBurner

Volunteering for Child’s Dream

Friday, July 2nd, 2010
Map of Thailand

Our Location, Northern Thailand

Once we reach Chiang Mai we will travel to Mae Hong Son, an 8 hour bus ride north west, to a village near the Burmese border. We will be living and working in the Tomato Village for 1 month, teaching English and generally making ourselves useful around the place, alongside Benjamin, the founder of the school.

The Tomato Village is a one-hour drive from Mae Hong Son up a very steep, winding road. It is beautifully situated within a couple of kms from the Burmese border, surrounded by scenic mountains.

Many ethnic minorities from Burma call this village their home.  Benjamin left Burma a long time ago to seek refuge in Thailand and has been living here ever since.

Benjamin started to teach English to some local minority children and his small wooden house served as school. In 2004 Child’s Dream built a small school (incl. two toilets) to an accommodate English classes for up to  40 children.

It is important for these minority children to learn English because this enhances their opportunities to find a job or to continue their studies. Being able to speak English is a valuable asset in Thailand, as it not only provides a competitive edge, but also increases the social status of these minority people.

Find out more about the Tomato Village project…

Benjamin with children at school

We will be blogging, filming and photographing our experience here and hope to share the stories of the people who live here, with you at home. It’s a great opportunity for us and we hope we will help the children of the Tomato Village during our stay.

We are cycling to raise money to build a school with Child’s Dream. Please donate as much as you can afford. Our bikeabout trip, and our stay at the Tomato Village is entirely self-funded, so any money you donate will go directly to the charity, it will not cover any of our living costs – it is our choice to be there.

Related Blog Entries

 Subscribe in a reader or enter your email address and get the next post via email

Delivered by FeedBurner